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Saturday, March 11, 2006

Fw: [rosacea] Re: Ocular Rosacea

Here's Laura's post on ocular rosacea.

Carla C

18 Comments:

  • At 6:52 PM, Anonymous Laura said…

    --- In rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com, "cc" <belcanto@b...> wrote:


    Thanks, but Dr. Nase wrote that;  I just copied and pasted it from earlier posts of his on this support group,  having saved it earlier because I had terrible occular rosacea.  I apologize for not crediting him for it!   It's not my work,  it's his!


    Cheers,
    Laura


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        http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

     
  • At 7:22 PM, Anonymous red_robot_77 said…

    Hi everyone, I don't read the board on a regular basis anymore because the more I think about Rosacea the worse my condition gets. It may sound crazy but I seriously believe it and have a clear and burn free skin to prove it (to myself)

    Anyways I felt bad about not posting about my experience with the N- Acetylcysteine drops that I have been using for the past year with GREAT SUCCESS. I have found out about them through absolute coincidence but have been using them for a year now. For me it takes away the eye problem completely when I use them regularly (which has become part of my daily routine). The medical details are below in Dr. Nase's post and from what I understand it helps to balance the mucus/oil/water of the eye which was my main problem. Sticky mucus, white particals swimming on the surface of the eye, glued together lashes in the morning, blurry vision,and the constant "there's something in my eye" feeling etc. I am guessing the effects are not lasting, as when I stop using these drops for a couple of days my eyes are as if I never used anything. But I havent heard of (not that I know anyone else using the drops) or read of any side effects or damages to the eye caused by prolonged use. And like I said earlier it has been a year for me now. I use the brand BRUNAC, made by an italian pharmaceutical co. called Bruschettini. But I have found out about another brand Ilube� Viscous Eye Drops (I just copy pasted that) which probably is the exact same thing, but I am guessing it has to be more common and thus available to more people on this board.

    I just wanted to share this information and hope it helps anyone. Have a great weekend! Iris

    > Ocular rosacea is a disorder that affects both the eye surface > and > eyelid.  Some of the most common symptoms include:

    > .  Bloodshot eyes > .  Burning sensations > .  Eye pain

    > .  Foreign body sensations of the eye surface > .  Excess tearing of the eye > .  Hyper-sensitivity of the eye surface

    > .  Eye irritation to wind, cold, smoke, indoor heating > .  Photophobia (pain and tearing of the eyes triggered by bright > light). > .  Itching of the eye surface

    > .  Redness, crusting, and inflammation of the eyelids. In some > cases, crust may form overnight that `glues' the eyelids > together. > .  Chalazia (inflammatory bump on the eyelid) > .  Stye (inflammation of an eyelash follicle)

    > .  Excess discharge from the sebaceous glands of the eyelids. > .  Loss of eyelashes > .  Severe damage to the cornea and blindness

    > Obviously, there is a great degree of overlap with eye symptoms > from > allergies. It is very wise to see an eye specialist.  They will > run > a thorough series of tests to determine the most probable cause > of > your symptoms, and the physician should give you some > effective > treatment options.

    > In all simplicity, ocular rosacea is a combination of dry eye and > ocular inflammation.  Surprisingly, relieving the dry eye > symptoms > usually results in substantial improvement of ocular rosacea.

    > One of the main complaints that occular rosacea sufferers > complain > of is blurry vision.  In 99% of the cases this actually has > nothing > to do with vision loss.  It has to do with a disturbance in the > three > layers of moisture on your eye surface (mucus, water and oil). > This > (and sometimes the inflammation) plays a role. Good treatment > focuses on > getting back a normal tear film layer first, then seeing what > happens.

    > ARTIFICIAL TEARS are one of the best things you can do for your > eyes. > While treatment for ocular rosacea is usually multifactorial, > several > studies have shown that daily use of artificial tears for three > to > four > months can help the tear film stabilize by decreasing ocular > irritation. > Then patients can sometimes stop immediately or just use them > upon > flare ups.  PLEASE DON'T USE VASO-CONSTRICTOR EYE > DROPS! > The challenge is to find the right eye drop for your eye. The eye > vessels in general are a lot more forgiving then the facial > vessels.

    > Many folks recommend Refresh Plus Drops for Sensitive Eyes. I > have found > great success with Thera Tears eye drops, which are > preservative free.

    > In many cases, the normal eye drops are not strong enough. > That is > why the leaders in the industry have made gel drops. Several of > these > gel drops by themselves have been shown to improve the entire > tear > film layer, stabilize the water concentration and electrolyte > balance, > and reduce some forms of inflammation. Gels last 4 to 8 times > longer > than most normal eye drops.

    > Some of the newer versions of gel drops worth a try are:

    > 1.  GenTeal Eye Gel ^ Carbopol 980 gel.  This is the strongest > gel > drop. For flat out moisturization without blurriness, Dr. Nase > likes > thise new preservative free gel by GenTeal.

    > 2.  Bausch and Lomb Liquid Gel ^ Hypromellose gel.

    > 3.  Systane ^ hydroxypropyl guar.  This is the newest gel > derivative > and there is quite a bit of information on pubmed about the guar > actions.

    > Many like the Similasan I and II drops. For those   with severe > dry > eye, > the Lacriserts placed under the eyelid at night still have no > match.

    > Another good topical for ocular rosacea is an ointment called > Lacrilube > by Allergan. It is kind of thick and sticky so you won't really > be > able > to use it during the day. It definitely makes your eyes feel > better, > especially when they have that foreign body sensation or > irritation. > You put it directly in the pocket of your eyes.

    > If the inflammation is still severe, Doxycycline 100 mgs 2 to 4 > times > a day can be used. or Periostat 40 mgs.  If this fails, then the > mast > cell inhibitor Patanol is always a good try.

    > Two new eye drops/suspensions continue to show promise for > moderate > to severe ocular rosacea.

    > 1.  10% N-acetylcysteine drops (Mucomyst) -- This mucolytic > agent > can be used successfully in rosacea patients with abnormal tear > film > layer (mucus layer).  In ocular rosacea, the superficial > inflammation > can alter goblet cells, which affects the production of the tear > film > layer.  This is the first agent to address this specific problem.

    > 2.  Cyclosporine ophthalmic (Restasis) drops -- Used to relieve > dry eyes > caused by suppressed tear production secondary to ocular > inflammation. > First eye drop to actually increase natural tear production, > stabilize > tear film layer and resolve ocular inflammation. Restasis eye > drops > are available by prescription. It can take up to 3 months to see > their > full effect.

    > Oral cyclosporine can cause a number of side effects.  Topical > cyclosporine (restasis) should be used cautiously in moderate > to > severe occular rosacea patients, but it is generally much safer > to > use. > Medical studies indicate it may be used safely long term 6 to 9 > months > with a low side effect profile.  In many patients, it relieves > the > inflammation and therefore stops the tear film layer from > breaking up. > Regarding rosacea, it specifically blocks several classes of > inflammatory > cytokines on the ocular surface, which this makes the ocular > surface > more "healthy".  If you decide to start the eye drops, follow up > with > your > doctor and get ocular surface testing every 3 to 6 months.

    > Supplemental help for Dry Eyes & Ocular Rosacea

    > There are two new oral products on the market for adjunctive > treatment of dry eyes and ocular inflammation.  While the web > sites > listed below certainly are promotional, they are quite > informative > and are consistent with the current medical information on dry > eye > syndrome, ocular inflammation, and treatment of both > conditions.

    > They both utilize essential fatty oil supplementation and one > brand > has added mucin to their mixture (which theoretically may help > support the inner most layer of the tear film - the mucous > layer). > In addition to daily lid hygiene and eye drop/eye gel therapy, > these > might be worth a 60 day trial in those ocular rosacea sufferers > with > persistent problems.

    > 1.  Hydroeye Softgels.    Claims to: > a.  Decrease ocular surface inflammation > b.  Stabilize tear film by thickening outer oil layer >

     
  • At 1:38 AM, Anonymous kemx said…

    red     where did you first learn of this therapy? it sounds wonderful.     i am curious if you have an eye dr that you see regularly and if so, what does he/she think of this tx?     thanks, emily

      ----- Original Message -----   From: red_robot_77   To: rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com   Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2005 10:50 PM   Subject: Fw: [rosacea] Re: Ocular Rosacea / N-acetylcysteine

      Hi everyone, I don't read the board on a regular basis anymore   because the more I think about Rosacea the worse my condition gets.   It may sound crazy but I seriously believe it and have a clear and   burn free skin to prove it (to myself)

      Anyways I felt bad about not posting about my experience with the N-   Acetylcysteine drops that I have been using for the past year with   GREAT SUCCESS. I have found out about them through absolute   coincidence but have been using them for a year now. For me it takes   away the eye problem completely when I use them regularly (which has   become part of my daily routine). The medical details are below in   Dr. Nase's post and from what I understand it helps to balance the   mucus/oil/water of the eye which was my main problem. Sticky mucus,   white particals swimming on the surface of the eye, glued together   lashes in the morning, blurry vision,and the constant "there's   something in my eye" feeling etc.   I am guessing the effects are not lasting, as when I stop using   these drops for a couple of days my eyes are as if I never used   anything. But I havent heard of (not that I know anyone else using   the drops) or read of any side effects or damages to the eye caused   by prolonged use. And like I said earlier it has been a year for me   now.   I use the brand BRUNAC, made by an italian pharmaceutical co. called   Bruschettini. But I have found out about another brand Ilube�   Viscous Eye Drops (I just copy pasted that) which probably is the   exact same thing, but I am guessing it has to be more common and   thus available to more people on this board.

      I just wanted to share this information and hope it helps anyone.   Have a great weekend!   Iris

      > Ocular rosacea is a disorder that affects both the eye surface   > and   > eyelid.  Some of the most common symptoms include:

      > .  Bloodshot eyes   > .  Burning sensations   > .  Eye pain

      > .  Foreign body sensations of the eye surface   > .  Excess tearing of the eye   > .  Hyper-sensitivity of the eye surface

      > .  Eye irritation to wind, cold, smoke, indoor heating   > .  Photophobia (pain and tearing of the eyes triggered by bright   > light).   > .  Itching of the eye surface

      > .  Redness, crusting, and inflammation of the eyelids. In some   > cases, crust may form overnight that `glues' the eyelids   > together.   > .  Chalazia (inflammatory bump on the eyelid)   > .  Stye (inflammation of an eyelash follicle)

      > .  Excess discharge from the sebaceous glands of the eyelids.   > .  Loss of eyelashes   > .  Severe damage to the cornea and blindness

      > Obviously, there is a great degree of overlap with eye symptoms   > from   > allergies. It is very wise to see an eye specialist.  They will   > run   > a thorough series of tests to determine the most probable cause   > of   > your symptoms, and the physician should give you some   > effective   > treatment options.

      > In all simplicity, ocular rosacea is a combination of dry eye and   > ocular inflammation.  Surprisingly, relieving the dry eye   > symptoms   > usually results in substantial improvement of ocular rosacea.

      > One of the main complaints that occular rosacea sufferers   > complain   > of is blurry vision.  In 99% of the cases this actually has   > nothing   > to do with vision loss.  It has to do with a disturbance in the   > three   > layers of moisture on your eye surface (mucus, water and oil).   > This   > (and sometimes the inflammation) plays a role. Good treatment   > focuses on   > getting back a normal tear film layer first, then seeing what   > happens.

      > ARTIFICIAL TEARS are one of the best things you can do for your   > eyes.   > While treatment for ocular rosacea is usually multifactorial,   > several   > studies have shown that daily use of artificial tears for three   > to   > four   > months can help the tear film stabilize by decreasing ocular   > irritation.   > Then patients can sometimes stop immediately or just use them   > upon   > flare ups.  PLEASE DON'T USE VASO-CONSTRICTOR EYE   > DROPS!   > The challenge is to find the right eye drop for your eye. The eye   > vessels in general are a lot more forgiving then the facial   > vessels.

      > Many folks recommend Refresh Plus Drops for Sensitive Eyes. I   > have found   > great success with Thera Tears eye drops, which are   > preservative free.

      > In many cases, the normal eye drops are not strong enough.   > That is   > why the leaders in the industry have made gel drops. Several of   > these   > gel drops by themselves have been shown to improve the entire   > tear   > film layer, stabilize the water concentration and electrolyte   > balance,   > and reduce some forms of inflammation. Gels last 4 to 8 times   > longer   > than most normal eye drops.

      > Some of the newer versions of gel drops worth a try are:

      > 1.  GenTeal Eye Gel ^ Carbopol 980 gel.  This is the strongest   > gel   > drop. For flat out moisturization without blurriness, Dr. Nase   > likes   > thise new preservative free gel by GenTeal.

      > 2.  Bausch and Lomb Liquid Gel ^ Hypromellose gel.

      > 3.  Systane ^ hydroxypropyl guar.  This is the newest gel   > derivative   > and there is quite a bit of information on pubmed about the guar   > actions.

      > Many like the Similasan I and II drops. For those   with severe   > dry   > eye,   > the Lacriserts placed under the eyelid at night still have no   > match.

      > Another good topical for ocular rosacea is an ointment called   > Lacrilube   > by Allergan. It is kind of thick and sticky so you won't really   > be   > able   > to use it during the day. It definitely makes your eyes feel   > better,   > especially when they have that foreign body sensation or   > irritation.   > You put it directly in the pocket of your eyes.

      > If the inflammation is still severe, Doxycycline 100 mgs 2 to 4   > times   > a day can be used. or Periostat 40 mgs.  If this fails, then the   > mast   > cell inhibitor Patanol is always a good try.

      > Two new eye drops/suspensions continue to show promise for   > moderate   > to severe ocular rosacea.

      > 1.  10% N-acetylcysteine drops (Mucomyst) -- This mucolytic   > agent   > can be used successfully in rosacea patients with abnormal tear   > film   > layer (mucus layer).  In ocular rosacea, the superficial   > inflammation   > can alter goblet cells, which affects the production of the tear   > film   > layer.  This is the first agent to address this specific problem.

      > 2.  Cyclosporine ophthalmic (Restasis) drops -- Used to relieve   > dry eyes   > caused by suppressed tear production secondary to ocular   > inflammation.   > First eye drop to actually increase natural tear production,   > stabilize   > tear film layer and resolve ocular inflammation. Restasis eye   > drops   > are available by prescription. It can take up to 3 months to see   > their   > full effect.

      > Oral cyclosporine can cause a number of side effects.  Topical   > cyclosporine (restasis) should be used cautiously in moderate   > to   > severe occular rosacea patients, but it is generally much safer   > to   > use.   > Medical studies indicate it may be used safely long term 6 to 9   > months   > with a low side effect profile.  In many patients, it relieves   > the   > inflammation and therefore stops the tear film layer from   > breaking up.   > Regarding rosacea, it specifically blocks several classes of   > inflammatory   > cytokines on the ocular surface, which this makes the ocular   > surface   > more "healthy".  If you decide to start the eye drops, follow up   > with   > your   > doctor and get ocular surface testing every 3 to 6 months.

      > Supplemental help for Dry Eyes & Ocular Rosacea

      > There are two new oral products on the market for adjunctive   > treatment of dry eyes and ocular inflammation.  While the web   > sites   > listed below certainly are promotional, they are quite   > informative   > and are consistent with the current medical information on dry   > eye   > syndrome, ocular inflammation, and treatment of both   > conditions.

      > They both utilize essential fatty oil supplementation and one   > brand   > has added mucin to their mixture (which theoretically may help   > support the inner most layer of the tear film - the mucous   > layer).   > In addition to daily lid hygiene and eye drop/eye gel therapy,   > these   > might be worth a 60 day trial in those ocular rosacea sufferers   > with   > persistent problems.

      > 1.  Hydroeye Softgels.    Claims to:   > a.  Decrease ocular surface inflammation   > b.  Stabilize tear film by thickening outer oil layer   >

     
  • At 2:53 AM, Anonymous pasco...@gmail.com said…

    meant for the group.

    ===8<==============Original message text=============== From: red_robot_77 <r@robot77.com> To: rosacea-support-ow@yahoogroups.com Date: Saturday, December 10, 2005, 1:55:35 PM Subject: Ocular Rosacea / N-acetylcysteine

    Hi, its kinda a long story. I have a dermatologist friend who in my opinion is not such a good dermatologist. Despite being a good friend of course. She has been arguing with me over the past few years about rosacea and claims I don't have the condition. Her idea of a rosacean is someone with obvious disfigurement, which she has showed me pictures of from her textbook. She does not have much knowledge about the condition itself and her ways are absolute oldschool as she keeps prescribing me cortisole ointments and other stereoids which I never use. (thanks to this board) Anyways she knows of my eye problem and it had goten so bad last year around this time that I wanted to poke my own eyes out from all the discomfort and pain they caused. I have limited access to drugs and care products due to my geographic location but had found eye scubs etc. I used many a boxes of doxycyline which has maybe helped with my acne but no great improvement with the eyes. All the above had been recommended by Dr. Nase at the time. All messages which are probably still in the archives. So my friend the dermatologist asks another eye doctor friend of hers about dry and brittle eyes. That doctor has told her that there is a new medicine out and that it should cure dryness of the eyes and was used to treat dry eyes on   patients with cancer. Now that I have used the eyedrops for a year and have read about the active ingediants I see that it doesn't fit to that description at all. First because of the fact that it doesn't treat anything, because the effects are temporary and second because the active ingrediant would only help with dryness caused by abnormal mucus and oil production (like the rosacea eye) and not for dryness thats caused by some systemic illness like sjogrens. But still it amazes me that although she had the facts completely wrong she still told me about n-acetylcysteine drops which was apparently all that I needed. I felt like god himself has sent me these. It is amazing. I really don't feel any discomfort at all anymore, my eyes are perfectly normal when I keep using the drops and I sincerely hope that they will do the same for anyone who gives them a try. I don't wash/scrub my eyes anymore and can wear make up again. (I still stay away from powder make-up because my eyes are still sensitive to dust and light) but cream eyelid shadow / mascara / eyeliner are perfectly ok for everyday, and I don'T even have to buy the high end brands. I use revlon without any problems. I hope all this has not jinxed my good luck with the drops. I have waited a year before I gave everyone a review so I know that the effects are for real. As I said I don't participate much anymore for reasons I mentioned in my previous post but will try to answer any questions you may have about the drops.

    PS: before I go I want to tell you about CLEANSING OILS which I discovered a few months ago. Seems like Asian women have known about it for decades and they use it all the time but for some strange reason I the skincare enthusiast had never heard of it before. I bought a bottle of cleansing oil for make up removal, this one is the brand Kanebo, there are also brands like Shiseido etc who make cleansing oils. It completely removes make-up in seconds, it is an oil but transforms into cleansing milk when you dilute it with water and it feels as if you didn't just cleanse your face. No stretching no dryness no oily residue. Its perfect for me. Bought on ebay for 8 US dollarsfrom a vendor that lives in Hong Kong. Highly recommended for all who look for a non irritating make up remover.

    Best Wishes to all Iris

    --- In rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com, "kemx" <kemx@g...> wrote: if so, what does he/she think of this tx?


    ...

     
  • At 4:07 AM, Anonymous Kenne Dean said…

    Are these eyedrops available over-the-counter, or do they require a physician's prescription?  It sounds like just what I need.

    Kenne

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  • At 7:23 AM, Anonymous andreahu999 said…

    A very hot compress (hot towel) on the eyes for 5 minutes 3 times a day cured my very swollen eye when drops weren't giving me relief.

    --- In rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com, "cc" <belcanto@...> wrote:



    > Here's Laura's post on ocular rosacea.

    > Carla C

    > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Laura" <laura@...>

    > Ocular rosacea is a disorder that affects both the eye surface > and > eyelid.  Some of the most common symptoms include:

    > .  Bloodshot eyes > .  Burning sensations > .  Eye pain

    > .  Foreign body sensations of the eye surface > .  Excess tearing of the eye > .  Hyper-sensitivity of the eye surface

    > .  Eye irritation to wind, cold, smoke, indoor heating > .  Photophobia (pain and tearing of the eyes triggered by bright > light). > .  Itching of the eye surface

    > .  Redness, crusting, and inflammation of the eyelids. In some > cases, crust may form overnight that `glues' the eyelids > together. > .  Chalazia (inflammatory bump on the eyelid) > .  Stye (inflammation of an eyelash follicle)

    > .  Excess discharge from the sebaceous glands of the eyelids. > .  Loss of eyelashes > .  Severe damage to the cornea and blindness

    > Obviously, there is a great degree of overlap with eye symptoms > from > allergies. It is very wise to see an eye specialist.  They will > run > a thorough series of tests to determine the most probable cause > of > your symptoms, and the physician should give you some > effective > treatment options.

    > In all simplicity, ocular rosacea is a combination of dry eye and > ocular inflammation.  Surprisingly, relieving the dry eye > symptoms > usually results in substantial improvement of ocular rosacea.

    > One of the main complaints that occular rosacea sufferers > complain > of is blurry vision.  In 99% of the cases this actually has > nothing > to do with vision loss.  It has to do with a disturbance in the > three > layers of moisture on your eye surface (mucus, water and oil). > This > (and sometimes the inflammation) plays a role. Good treatment > focuses on > getting back a normal tear film layer first, then seeing what > happens.

    > ARTIFICIAL TEARS are one of the best things you can do for your > eyes. > While treatment for ocular rosacea is usually multifactorial, > several > studies have shown that daily use of artificial tears for three > to > four > months can help the tear film stabilize by decreasing ocular > irritation. > Then patients can sometimes stop immediately or just use them > upon > flare ups.  PLEASE DON'T USE VASO-CONSTRICTOR EYE > DROPS! > The challenge is to find the right eye drop for your eye. The eye > vessels in general are a lot more forgiving then the facial > vessels.

    > Many folks recommend Refresh Plus Drops for Sensitive Eyes. I > have found > great success with Thera Tears eye drops, which are > preservative free.

    > In many cases, the normal eye drops are not strong enough. > That is > why the leaders in the industry have made gel drops. Several of > these > gel drops by themselves have been shown to improve the entire > tear > film layer, stabilize the water concentration and electrolyte > balance, > and reduce some forms of inflammation. Gels last 4 to 8 times > longer > than most normal eye drops.

    > Some of the newer versions of gel drops worth a try are:

    > 1.  GenTeal Eye Gel ^ Carbopol 980 gel.  This is the strongest > gel > drop. For flat out moisturization without blurriness, Dr. Nase > likes > thise new preservative free gel by GenTeal.

    > 2.  Bausch and Lomb Liquid Gel ^ Hypromellose gel.

    > 3.  Systane ^ hydroxypropyl guar.  This is the newest gel > derivative > and there is quite a bit of information on pubmed about the guar > actions.

    > Many like the Similasan I and II drops. For those   with severe > dry > eye, > the Lacriserts placed under the eyelid at night still have no > match.

    > Another good topical for ocular rosacea is an ointment called > Lacrilube > by Allergan. It is kind of thick and sticky so you won't really > be > able > to use it during the day. It definitely makes your eyes feel > better, > especially when they have that foreign body sensation or > irritation. > You put it directly in the pocket of your eyes.

    > If the inflammation is still severe, Doxycycline 100 mgs 2 to 4 > times > a day can be used. or Periostat 40 mgs.  If this fails, then the > mast > cell inhibitor Patanol is always a good try.

    > Two new eye drops/suspensions continue to show promise for > moderate > to severe ocular rosacea.

    > 1.  10% N-acetylcysteine drops (Mucomyst) -- This mucolytic > agent > can be used successfully in rosacea patients with abnormal tear > film > layer (mucus layer).  In ocular rosacea, the superficial > inflammation > can alter goblet cells, which affects the production of the tear > film > layer.  This is the first agent to address this specific problem.

    > 2.  Cyclosporine ophthalmic (Restasis) drops -- Used to relieve > dry eyes > caused by suppressed tear production secondary to ocular > inflammation. > First eye drop to actually increase natural tear production, > stabilize > tear film layer and resolve ocular inflammation. Restasis eye > drops > are available by prescription. It can take up to 3 months to see > their > full effect.

    > Oral cyclosporine can cause a number of side effects.  Topical > cyclosporine (restasis) should be used cautiously in moderate > to > severe occular rosacea patients, but it is generally much safer > to > use. > Medical studies indicate it may be used safely long term 6 to 9 > months > with a low side effect profile.  In many patients, it relieves > the > inflammation and therefore stops the tear film layer from > breaking up. > Regarding rosacea, it specifically blocks several classes of > inflammatory > cytokines on the ocular surface, which this makes the ocular > surface > more "healthy".  If you decide to start the eye drops, follow up > with > your > doctor and get ocular surface testing every 3 to 6 months.

    > Supplemental help for Dry Eyes & Ocular Rosacea

    > There are two new oral products on the market for adjunctive > treatment of dry eyes and ocular inflammation.  While the web > sites > listed below certainly are promotional, they are quite > informative > and are consistent with the current medical information on dry > eye > syndrome, ocular inflammation, and treatment of both > conditions.

    > They both utilize essential fatty oil supplementation and one > brand > has added mucin to their mixture (which theoretically may help > support the inner most layer of the tear film - the mucous > layer). > In addition to daily lid hygiene and eye drop/eye gel therapy, > these > might be worth a 60 day trial in those ocular rosacea sufferers > with > persistent problems.

    > 1.  Hydroeye Softgels.    Claims to: > a.  Decrease ocular surface inflammation > b.  Stabilize tear film by thickening outer oil layer >

     
  • At 8:22 AM, Anonymous emily kemx said…

    hi all, Heres anohter ingredient i'm interested in that is  in my anti-aging eye treatment. I can find no where that it might be a family to the retinaes.  The product is-TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution        Palmitoyl pentapeptide 3, is the ingredient. It is listed as : Advanced peptide Matrixyl� thanks to anyone who can figure this out. emily

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    <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

     
  • At 12:08 AM, Anonymous kemx said…

    Hi all you aging beautiful rosy's out there.     In my quest to find suitable anti-aging products I found this one.TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution     So far the TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution i bought from

     
  • At 7:38 AM, Anonymous Nikk...@aol.com said…

    If you really do some in-depth research regarding anti-aging serums, you will find that they don't actually erase the wrinkles, they merely heavily moisturize the skin so that the wrinkles smooth out (temporarily).  As soon as you stop using it, the wrinkles will come back.  There is really no magic cream that will rid us of wrinkles.  Most of it is marketing hype - don't fall prey, especially to the creams that can cost hundreds of dollars.  These companies know how superficial and obsessed with youth our society has become and they prey on our insecurities.  The only real way to rid your face of wrinkles is surgery or botox, which is also temporary.

     
  • At 6:23 PM, Anonymous nurse_artist said…

    Emily: You can get palmitoyl pentapeptide-3 (Matrixyl) here for $10.50 and just mix it with 4 ounces of your own cream or lotion.

    @yahoogroups.com, "kemx" <kemx@...> wrote: one.TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution alternatives didn't



    > work, palmitoyl pentapeptide-3, with its good safety profile, may be worth a > try. palmitoyl pentapeptide-3 may also be considered as a nonirritating fall > back option for people who develop skin irritation in response to retinoids > or alpha-hydroxy acids. > If you decide to try palmitoyl pentapeptide-3, keep in mind that its > concentration in a product should be sufficiently high (e.g. matching the > levels used in the clinical studies). There is a large price variation > between different palmitoyl pentapeptide-3 products, although none are > dirt-cheap. However, the price does not always reflect the concentration of > the active ingredient. It may reflect prestige of the brand, advertising > overhead, sophistication of packaging and so forth. Be wise. Make sure you > are paying a fair price per until of the pentapeptide. For recommended > palmitoyl pentapeptide-3 concentrations, clinical data and details see Skin > Rejuvenation Infopack.

    >   Web  SmartSkinCare.com

    > Copyright � 1999-2006 by Dr. G. Todorov / SmartSkinCare.com > Site Disclaimer | Copyright Certification

    >   ----- Original Message ----- >   From: emily kemx >   To: rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com >   Sent: Monday, March 06, 2006 10:31 PM >   Subject: [rosacea] mystery ingredients..

    >   hi all, >   Heres anohter ingredient i'm interested in that is  in my anti- aging eye >   treatment. I can find no where that it might be a family to the retinaes. >    The product is-TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution >          Palmitoyl pentapeptide 3, is the ingredient. >   It is listed as : Advanced peptide Matrixyl� >   thanks to anyone who can figure this out. emily

    >   -- >   Please read the list highlights and FAQ: @yahoogroups.com

    <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

     
  • At 3:53 PM, Anonymous kemx said…

        yea, i can see where it plumps the area....and i can only hope it doesn't mimic a rosacea inflamation and make it worse.     i only spent $35.00 and it's returnable--but if it works out good enough i'll keep it.     ..i don't want to have poison injected into me....or go under the knife either...yikes.     So any wrinkle smoother that doesn't inflame my rosace will be ok with me.......esp. when trying to camoflage rosacea with makeup that settles into those fine lines at 54.     emily

     
  • At 11:53 AM, Anonymous kemx said…

    thanks Artist, i will chk this out. I used a honey and aloe home made mask today......i'm thinking the honey would have exfoliating properties since it is a sugar. I left it on 2min......then washed with cetaphil once i rinsed it off.....then used my reg. topicals. we shall see if i have the "measles" later...hahaha. emily

     
  • At 1:23 PM, Anonymous kemx said…

    do you think this makes new viens? emily

     
  • At 7:23 PM, Anonymous nurse_artist said…

    Emily: I don't think so, but, to be sure you may want to ask Hannah from the skin actives forum - the email is i@skinactives.com. She is a biochemist and understands the properties of the active ingredients. There is another active called dermagen that does the same thing, and may be better. If you ask, let us know what she says!

    Artist

    --- In rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com, "kemx" <kemx@...> wrote: wrinkle cure candidate





    >   Emily: You can get palmitoyl pentapeptide-3 (Matrixyl) here for $10.50 >   and just mix it with 4 ounces of your own cream or lotion.

    >   @yahoogroups.com, "kemx" <kemx@> wrote:

    >   > Hi all you aging beautiful rosy's out there. >   >     In my quest to find suitable anti-aging products I found this >   one.TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution >   >     So far the TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution >   > i bought from @yahoogroups.com >   >   Sent: Monday, March 06, 2006 10:31 PM >   >   Subject: [rosacea] mystery ingredients..

    >   >   hi all, >   >   Heres anohter ingredient i'm interested in that is  in my anti- >   aging eye >   >   treatment. I can find no where that it might be a family to the >   retinaes. >   >    The product is-TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution >   >          Palmitoyl pentapeptide 3, is the ingredient. >   >   It is listed as : Advanced peptide Matrixyl� >   >   thanks to anyone who can figure this out. emily

    >   >   -- >   >   Please read the list highlights and FAQ: @yahoogroups.com

    <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

     
  • At 8:53 PM, Anonymous Lilith Mageborn said…

    And good genes, too. ;-)

    Sue

    On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 10:16:09 -0500 Nikk@aol.com writes:



    > If you really do some in-depth research regarding anti-aging serums, > you will find that they don't actually erase the wrinkles, they > merely heavily moisturize the skin so that the wrinkles smooth out > (temporarily).  As soon as you stop using it, the wrinkles will come > back.  There is really no magic cream that will rid us of wrinkles.   > Most of it is marketing hype - don't fall prey, especially to the > creams that can cost hundreds of dollars.  These companies know how > superficial and obsessed with youth our society has become and they > prey on our insecurities.  The only real way to rid your face of > wrinkles is surgery or botox, which is also temporary.

    > -----Original Message----- > From: emily kemx <k@gbis.com> > To: rosacea-supp@yahoogroups.com > Sent: Mon, 6 Mar 2006 22:31:32 -0800 > Subject: [rosacea] mystery ingredients..

    > hi all, > Heres anohter ingredient i'm interested in that is  in my anti-aging > eye > treatment. I can find no where that it might be a family to the > retinaes. >  The product is-TYK Eye NRGe Eye Repair Solution >        Palmitoyl pentapeptide 3, is the ingredient. > It is listed as : Advanced peptide Matrixyl� > thanks to anyone who can figure this out. emily

    > -- > Please read the list highlights and FAQ: @yahoogroups.com

    <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

     
  • At 8:23 AM, Anonymous kemx said…

    thanks again Artist...my email is on the way- I hope i get an answer and i will let everyone know.emily

     
  • At 10:08 AM, Anonymous woody1...@aol.com said…

    In a message dated 3/7/2006 6:32:18 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  

    If you  really do some in-depth research regarding anti-aging serums, you will find  that they don't actually erase the wrinkles, they merely heavily moisturize  the skin so that the wrinkles smooth out (temporarily).  As soon as you  stop using it, the wrinkles will come back.  There is really no magic  cream that will rid us of wrinkles.

    I wonder what's up with the emu oil then.  I have found that it has  slowly but surely erased some really deep creases/wrinkles/whatever in my  face.  I can skip a day or 2 or three and they don't come back.  How  long is temporary?

    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

    -- Please read the list highlights and FAQ: @yahoogroups.com

    <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

     
  • At 1:53 PM, Anonymous Nikk...@aol.com said…

    Oh, from what I've read, temporary can be anywhere from a few days to a few weeks.  Dateline NBC or 20/20 (one of those shows) did a great piece on these wrinkle creams and their great claims.  They did a good job of uncovering the reality of it all...

     

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